Want to show a video of Gaki for class. Copyright??

Discuss everything Gaki no Tsukai here.
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I am doing a project in my Japanese class about Japanese comedy and I want to show a video of Gaki no Tsukai. However you know how teachers can be.. with their "omgah no copyright pls" attitude. Thing is though, pretty much everything that is shown on TV has copyright. Was wondering if I need permission from gaki or something to show this project in my class??

If I do not need copyright is there a rule or something that I can show my teacher?
They don't going to give you any permission (I mean Gaki as a TV show) but you can use some of the older videos (There is some clause depending of the country about the old copyright stuffs) and you can put some "Copyright Statement" in the beggining of the video: http://rubric.ecampusalberta.ca/copyrightsamplestatement.pdf

But, is just your class, so I don't think there is going to be any problem
How old does it have to be? I am in the US and I want to use the no laughing batsu game police station, with jimmy.
As Arlekin said, I'm pretty sure the DMCA allows you to use copyrighted material for educational purposes, so I think you're fine, since you're showing the clip in school.
Shappuri Agemaaasu!!
Yeah, as Ni Oxx said...is for educational purposes, is not for sale and for gain money, so is alright. Police Batsu is old enough. You're Ok pal. Just be sure to show the Copyright Statement in the beginning for your teacher, and you're good to go :)

Btw, is funny. Today I'm playing the Police Batsu :D :D
Thanks guys, was wondering if anyone has a link to the older material clause or dmca for educational purposes? I just need something to show my teacher.
I'm not from the US, so I don't know about the regulations there, but with the copyright statement that I let you up there, is going to be fine
You can pretty much search for the batsu in Google and you will find it.
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Kawaii~
The age of the material doesn't matter as copyrights can be renewed, so you could use the Earth Defence Force Batsu for all the difference it'd make. It's only when a work has been released or classified as Public Domain that it becomes free game for all. But NTV is highly likely to renew their copyright (hence Youtube takedowns).

Since you're just using it to demonstrate what you're talking about in your analysis for educational purposes and aren't showing the full work (only a short portion e.g. Jimmy's scene), it'd likely fall into fair use. If you want to get nitty gritty then you'd have to obtain the batsu on DVD (e.g. via Amazon Japan), however for a one-off showing in a classroom I don't think you'll have to worry much. But no-ones a lawyer here so....

Here's an example of some US college guidelines on using Youtube videos in a classroom:
May I link to YouTube videos and other online videos in my Blackboard class page?

Yes, you may link to such sources. Using a link removes copyright concerns since you are neither copying or broadcasting the video. One warning, though, if you knowingly link to a video on a website that is illegally posted on that site, you could risk being charged with contributory infringement.

May I show YouTube, Netflix, Amazon Prime, Hulu, and other online videos to my on-campus class?

Under copyright, doing so is mostly akin to playing a DVD or VHS -- see the questions below for details. Online sites, however, have user licenses that govern your use of their sites. What might be allowed under copyright for instruction might not be allowed under the license. There is debate over whether these licenses exclude classroom use, but it is clear that none of them explicitly permit it. There has yet to be a clarifying court case or decisive statement from the companies. The safest courses of action are to show a VHS or DVD, to show a video from the ECU Libraries' Films on Demand service, and to refer students to view streaming content using their own accounts outside the classroom.

May I show movies, TV shows, documentaries, and other DVD or VHS content in the classroom?

Yes, showing the video in class is permissible under classroom use if it is related to the academic instruction of the day, however the class may not be taped or recorded. Only students enrolled in the course and the instructor should be present in the class during the showing of the video. You do not need to obtain 'public display' rights for videos shown for instructional purposes in a course. You would need 'public display' rights for other showings (e.g. club meetings & dorm socials).

"Someone" said that recently a court ruled we can break the circumvention code to show videos.


This is the wording - "...to accomplish the incorporation of short portions of motion pictures into new works for the purpose of criticism or comment..." The key is short portions, not the entire work.

Source: http://libguides.ecu.edu/content.php?pi ... id=3412236

Let us know what your classmates and teacher think of the weird world of Gaki! :D
Suga producer will come beat you with a stick.

More seriously, if this forum is still alive with all the download link of Downtown tv shows, I think you have no risk by showing some footage in your classroom.

How old does it have to be?


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public_domain

It don't concern modern works but olds like silent movies or classic books (Shakespeare,..)
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